Thursday, June 5, 2008

A Re-purposed Watering Can

I found a one-gallon, solid-copper watering can on sale at Target last spring. I thought it was pretty and I bought it. Before the season was over, the weld at the bottom of the spout had sprung a leak, and it was leaking at the bottom seam.

I used a tin snips, and cut open the top of the watering can. Then I cut notches along the sharp edge and bent each little section under with a needle-nosed pliers.

I filled the watering can with soil and planted it with a few cell-pack 'blue pearl' impatiens. I didn't even have to drill any drain holes since the watering can was already leaking at the bottom anyway.

Voila! I think I love this watering can as much as a planter as I did as a watering can. . . . and the maple helicopters continue to fall. . .

13 comments:

  1. What a grea idea! The watering can with the flower is beautiful :)

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  2. Love it! I checked out (from the library) Planting Junk a rather fun book that has photos of found and other objects that have been planted out...Yours could be in it.

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  3. Well, you've repurposed it magnificently! But I wonder why it already came apart like that? Makes me think I need to stick with the real old ones I find at tag sales!
    Brenda

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  4. That makes a wonderful planter!!! It is a shame it fell apart. But it is great you can use it for something else!!!

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  5. I've seen some watering cans planted up like that for sale. I just love that idea! Such a nice way to reuse something that might have otherwise found it's way to a landfill. I think I like it even better as a planter.

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  6. Thank you Marie. I think it will be even nicer when the impatiens get bigger.

    Gail, that book sound like it's right up my alley! DH has some old milk crates, and I was thinking about asking him if I could use one of them as a planter. I could moss it, and I think it would cool. I picked a broken clay pot out of the trash at the nursery a few weeks ago. Now it's on it's side in the garden with impatiens 'spilling' out of it. The pot is nicely aged and mossy. I think it's cool!

    Brenda, it didn't actually come apart, it's just leaky. Leaky isn't great for a watering can, but it's fine for a planter. I knew that cheap price for a solid-copper watering can was too good to be true! I agree with you - the old ones are probably much sturdier and more well-made. (and also would make cool planters!)

    Cindee, thanks! I hate to throw useful things away. I'm really happy with my new use for it. I never seem to have enough planters!

    Cinj, yep, I kind of stole the idea. They had some galvanized ones with really pretty combo plantings in them at the nursery about a month ago. They were very popular items, and went fast. Those were bigger than mine, probably two-gallon instead of one-gallon, so they held more plants.

    They had those watering-can planters a couple of years ago too, before I worked there. I resisted buying one, but I really wanted one. Now I have one!

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  7. This is a much prettier watering can than any of my plastic ones. I think it was meant to be a planter!

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  8. Cute post. A great eye is something you can't teach ... either you have it or don't ;)

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  9. Flea markets are great for finding unique pieces for planters. I've found cream cans, coal buckets and old red children's wagons for planters. Just drill a few holes and you have a planter that adds interest (and a good conversation piece) to the garden or patio.

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  10. Tres bien! Great idea, I have an old watering can with the same leaking issue and it's also quite heavy to carry when empty, never mind when full and leaking down my boots. You have definitely inspired my dull weather-related mood. ;-)

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  11. Rose, yep, I'm back to using the ugly plastic watering can again. It ain't pretty, but it works!

    Joey, aw, thanks! I'm glad you like it.

    Beth, Sometimes I wish I was more of a shopper, especially a garage sale, antique store, used books store, and flea market-shopper. I've seen some really cool stuff used as planters that comes from places like that.

    There's a woman around here who calls herself The Tattered Gardener. She sells a lot of 'junk' as planters, stencils garden signs on old wood, and she charges a very pretty penny for the stuff she finds and the simple signs she paints. I'm sure she's getting it all at the above types of places.

    Violet, if you do it, I hope you'll post a picture! I'd love to have an old, weathered galvanized watering can. Heck, I'd like to a have a collection of old watering cans! I'm just not much of a shopper, so it probably won't happen.

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  12. Positively brilliant! What a beautiful planter -- copper is one of my favorite metals...so warm and weathers so beautifully. My Mom has an ornamental copper watering can that she complains is too large for her living room (hah!) -- perhaps she'd like it planted better. ;-)

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  13. I love this - it looks wonderful!

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